protection

Phishing targeting SaaS and webmail services increased to 36% of all phishing attacks

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Originally seen: Helpnetsecurity on May 20th, 2019

Users of Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and webmail services are being targeted with increasing frequency, according to the APWG Q1 2019 Phishing Activity Trends Report.

SaaS webmail phishing increased

The category became the biggest target in Q1, accounting for 36 percent of all phishing attacks, for the first time eclipsing the payment-services category which suffered 27 percent of attacks recorded in the quarter.

Online SaaS applications have become fundamental business tools, since they are convenient to use and cost-effective. SaaS services include sales management, customer relationship management (CRM), human resource, billing and other office applications and collaboration tools.

“Phishers are interested in stealing logins to SaaS sites because they yield financial data and also personnel data, which can be leveraged for spear-phishing,” said Greg Aaron, APWG Senior Research Fellow.

Stefanie Ellis, AntiFraud Product & Marketing Manager at MarkMonitor said: “The total number of confirmed phishing sites increased in early 2019, with the biggest jump in March.”

The total number of phishing sites detected in 1Q of 2019 was 180,768. That was up notably from the 138,328 seen in the fourth quarter of 2018, and from the 151,014 seen in the third quarter of 2018.

Payment Services and Financial Institution phishing continued to suffer a high number of phishing attacks. But attacks against cloud storage and file hosting sites continued to drop, decreasing from 11.3 percent of all attacks in the first quarter of 2018 to just 2 percent in the first quarter of 2019.

Meanwhile, cybercriminals deployed HTTPS-protected phishing websites in record numbers, according to PhishLabs, posting a record high of nearly 60 percent of detected phishing websites in 1Q 2019 employing this data encryption protocol.

Phishers turn this security utility against users, leveraging the HTTPS protocols padlock icon that appears in the browser address bar to assure users that the website itself is trustworthy.

SaaS webmail phishing increased

“In Q1 2019, 58 percent of phishing sites were using SSL certificates, a significant increase from the prior quarter where 46 percent were using certificates,” said John LaCour, CTO of PhishLabs.

“There are two reasons we see more. Attackers can easily create free DV (Domain Validated) certificates, and more web sites are using SSL in general. More web sites are using SSL because browser warning users when SSL is not used. And most phishing is hosted on hacked, legitimate sites.”

Intel AMT flaw: How are corporate endpoints put at risk?

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Originally Seen: TechTarget by Judith Myerson

A recent flaw in Intel’s Advanced Management Technology enables hackers to gain access to endpoint devices. Discover how this flaw can be mitigated with expert Judith Myerson.

A flaw in Intel’s Advanced Management Technology enables hackers to exploit a simple vulnerability and gain control of corporate laptops. How is this possible, and what is the best way to mitigate the Intel AMT flaw?

Exploiting the flaw in Intel’s Advanced Management Technology (AMT) takes a few seconds. An attacker boots up his laptop by pressing CTRL-P, and then logs on to the Intel Management Engine BIOS Extension using admin as the default password. After changing the password, the attacker sets the user opt-in to None and connects to the victim’s laptop, bypassing a strong BIOSpassword and username.

The flaw enables the attacker to remotely access, read and modify data and applications that are assigned to a corporate user, and potentially even transfer them to the attacker’s server. Potential victims may be untargeted and merely be located in a waiting room or a public place. If the attacker finds that the victim’s laptop doesn’t have AMT, they can then search until a victim whose laptop requires AMT is found.

The best way to mitigate the Intel AMT flaw is to use Microsoft System Center Configuration for laptops connected to a Windows domain. System administrators can use it to:

  • Remotely query all corporate laptops about suspicious passwords.
  • Provision each laptop to require a strong password of 8 or more characters — a combination of numbers, letters and special characters is strongly recommended — and establish a policy on how often the password should be changed.
  • Disable AMT for all laptops that don’t require it. This means the corporate IT staff will not be able to have remote control over these laptops and will need to find other ways to remotely secure them.

Any laptops found to be affected should be addressed by enterprise security teams, and corporate incident response procedures should be used.

How to handle Ransomware in the Cloud

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Expert Ed Moyle looks at ransomware in the cloud and how it differs from traditional ransomware attacks. Find out how your organization can prepare for both.

Originally seen: December 2017 on Tech Target
With recent events, like the WannaCry and NotPetya ransomware outbreaks, most organizations are fully alert to the threat of ransomware. They may have invested significant time and energy in response to those events, or they may have spent equal time bolstering their own preparedness. There is a potential attack surface that may have received comparatively less attention, but that is nevertheless equally important: the cloud.

Cloud environments are no less susceptible to ransomware than other environments. However, they have properties that can make response and preparedness different. For example, they might employ different notification and communications channels, they might involve different personnel, and there may be a different control set in use. It can behoove organizations to think through ransomware in the cloud the same way they prepare for ransomware for internal systems and applications.

Ransomware in the cloud

Using an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) platform gives the cloud customer more visibility into the underlying OS than other cloud models, but this, in turn, means that issues, like patching — particularly in the case of legacy or special purpose systems — are just as complex as in other environments, and therefore may take longer than one might like.

The issue is that an IaaS environment might be susceptible to ransomware. What is different with IaaS, though, is how the organization discovers the ransomware, how it responds and how it protects against the threat. As a practical matter, different personnel are often responsible for direct oversight of IaaS workloads compared to other technology.

For example, cloud is conducive to shadow IT. It can be hard for enterprise security teams to identify and manage shadow cloud applications used by employees and lines of business across an organization. Will a development team, business team or other non-IT organization plan for — and be ready to remediate — ransomware in the cloud to the same extent as the technology organization?

Even if shadow IT isn’t a factor for an organization, initial notification of a ransomware event might come through a different channel than expected. For example, notifications could come from a relationship manager for larger deployments; a defined escalation channel with the service provider, which might be a business team; or through a provider-maintained service portal.

Also, keep in mind that both the resolution and implementation of specific countermeasures might need to be done through different channels. As an example, if a key activity in response to a rapidly proliferating ransomware, like WannaCry, is to proactively patch, the manner in which you affect this might vary for the cloud — an enterprise might need to schedule a maintenance window with its provider, for instance.

Aside from IaaS, other cloud models can be impacted, as well. Even SaaS isn’t immune — consider storage such as Dropbox, Google Drive, etc. Typically, these services work by syncing local files to the cloud; for a small organization, this might constitute its primary storage, backup or data sharing mechanism. What happens when the local files are encrypted, deleted, overwritten with garbage or otherwise compromised by ransomware? Those changes will be synced to the cloud.

Mitigation strategies for cloud ransomware

What can organizations do to prepare for ransomware in a cloud environment? There are a few things that can make response significantly easier. Probably the most effective thing organizations can do — for both cloud environments and for any other environment — is to specifically exercise response and escalation procedures.

Regardless of what method an organization employs, though, the most important thing is to think through it in advance and view protection measures critically.

For example, a tabletop exercise can be very helpful in this regard. A tabletop exercise defuses the primary question: will you pay the ransom? Invariably, someone will suggest paying it regardless of law enforcement and others arguing against it — discussing this specifically ahead of time helps clarify pros and cons when adrenaline levels aren’t off the charts.

Secondly, working through alert and response scenarios ahead of time means you get answers to key questions: how will you be notified of an event? Who will be notified, and what notification pathways correspond to specific cloud relationships? Also, what is required to take responsive action in each of those channels?

It’s also a useful idea to undertake a systematic risk assessment specifically for ransomware. You might, for example, look at backup and response processes to ensure that, should data be specifically targeted by ransomware that seeks to render it inaccessible, the organization has thought through protection and recovery strategies at the technical level.

For an IaaS relationship, think through and test backup and response services that service providers might offer, technical controls that they offer and the countermeasures the organization already employs. This level of risk analysis is probably already done for the enterprise as a whole, but you should take measures to specifically extend that to cloud relationships. This can be somewhat time-consuming for organizations that have numerous service provider relationships in place, but this effort can be folded into a broader activity that has value beyond just ransomware — for example, malware mitigation more generally, data gathering about cloud relationships, threat modeling, cloud governance or other activities that involve the systematic analysis of cloud relationships.

The arguably harder situation in the event of ransomware in the cloud is the intersection of SaaS and smaller organizations — specifically, the possibility of corruption of cloud storage through synchronization of ransomware-impacted files to a remote storage repository. Specific measures to prevent this are available, such as keeping a manually synced or time-initiated mirror of data at another repository, assuming that the volume in question isn’t such that this is prohibitively expensive.

Alternatively, backup solutions that keep prior iterations of data can provide a means of recovery even if the primary storage location is compromised. Regardless of what method an organization employs, though, the most important thing is to think through it in advance and view protection measures critically.

 

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