threats

Emotet Trojan: How to defend against fileless attacks

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Last Seen: March 2018 on Tech Target
An increase in fileless malware, including PowerShell malware, was reported in McAfee Labs’ December 2017 Threat Report. Discover how enterprises can defend again fileless attacks.

It can be easy to dispute or question industry reports from top security vendors because the data is often collected from those vendors’ customers, and it is frequently used to show how the vendors’ products can better protect enterprises.

However, these reports can often help enterprises improve their information security programs. Antimalware companies often use this data-driven tactic to dig into specific examples of threats so enterprises can determine if they are adequately protected from those threats.

In this tip, we’ll discuss PowerShell malware, the specific example of the Emotet Trojan and enterprise defenses for these threats.

PowerShell malware and the Emotet Trojan

McAfee reported a surge in fileless attacks in 2017’s Q3 in which malicious code in macros used PowerShell to execute malware. One notable piece of fileless malware was the Emotet Trojan.

Before getting into the details of the threat, it’s important to note than when a vendor report states that the highest number of incidents for a specific malware type was observed, that doesn’t necessarily mean that the number is all that meaningful. The amount of malware detected only matters to an antimalware company in terms of how many resources they need to analyze the malware, report on it and ensure that their customers are adequately protected.

When a report references fileless attacks, it also doesn’t necessarily mean that no files were used in the attack.

When a report references fileless attacks, it also doesn’t necessarily mean that no files were used in the attack. Fileless usually means that no files were left behind on a system for persistence, but files were used in the attack.

The fileless aspect could also mean that PowerShell, cmd or WMIC were used as part of the attack to execute code on the endpoint. This could include downloading a file or writing data to the registry to create a persistence mechanism on the endpoint.

Emotet is a type of banking Trojan that is distributed by botnets; it spams recipients to socially engineer them into opening a malicious attachment — usually a Word document that has a malicious macro. When the macro runs, it calls a PowerShell, cmd or WMIC command to download malware onto the endpoint for persistence.

While files are used in several different parts of the attack, the fileless aspect occurs when PowerShell or cmd is used to download the next step in the attack. Unlike using a downloader to download a piece of malware to the endpoint, the fileless approach can help to avoid potential detection.

Enterprise defenses against PowerShell malware

Since responding to malware threats is absolutely critical, ensuring your enterprise is prepared is important. We’ve discussed fileless malware at length, but malware is constantly evolving and, thus, security tools must do the same.

Some tools have incorporated functionality to address fileless attacks, while other new endpoint security tools have emerged to address these threats and current attacks. However, attacks continue to use known vulnerabilities or insecure functionality, as well as legitimate tools and functions like PowerShell, to take over endpoints.

 

While the Emotet Trojan contains new functionalities, some of them can still be blocked using basic endpoint security hygiene to prevent known vulnerabilities or insecure functionalities, such as limiting admin privilege, reducing the attack surface of an endpoint by removing or restricting unnecessary applications or tools, whitelisting, and keeping a system up to date with patches.

Your next step should be to check how your existing security tool vendors address Emotet because many different endpoint security vendors have different methods and advice on how to protect your enterprise. One common method among these tools is blocking executables or changes to the system via signatures, behavioral monitoring, or a combination of both detecting and monitoring common methods for persistence, such as preventing the Run registry keys from being modified.

Some of the tools specifically block Microsoft Word from calling out to PowerShell, which can block a malicious PowerShell command from executing on the system.

Examining infected systems on your network to determine how they were infected can identify which security controls need to be updated to properly protect your endpoints.

Conclusion

While the world is changing faster than anyone may realize or want to admit, some of the basics have stayed the same. Ensuring that you are regularly updating your information security program to identify which security controls are properly working is necessary to manage information security risk and protect your enterprise from the Emotet Trojan.

How to handle Ransomware in the Cloud

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Expert Ed Moyle looks at ransomware in the cloud and how it differs from traditional ransomware attacks. Find out how your organization can prepare for both.

Originally seen: December 2017 on Tech Target
With recent events, like the WannaCry and NotPetya ransomware outbreaks, most organizations are fully alert to the threat of ransomware. They may have invested significant time and energy in response to those events, or they may have spent equal time bolstering their own preparedness. There is a potential attack surface that may have received comparatively less attention, but that is nevertheless equally important: the cloud.

Cloud environments are no less susceptible to ransomware than other environments. However, they have properties that can make response and preparedness different. For example, they might employ different notification and communications channels, they might involve different personnel, and there may be a different control set in use. It can behoove organizations to think through ransomware in the cloud the same way they prepare for ransomware for internal systems and applications.

Ransomware in the cloud

Using an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) platform gives the cloud customer more visibility into the underlying OS than other cloud models, but this, in turn, means that issues, like patching — particularly in the case of legacy or special purpose systems — are just as complex as in other environments, and therefore may take longer than one might like.

The issue is that an IaaS environment might be susceptible to ransomware. What is different with IaaS, though, is how the organization discovers the ransomware, how it responds and how it protects against the threat. As a practical matter, different personnel are often responsible for direct oversight of IaaS workloads compared to other technology.

For example, cloud is conducive to shadow IT. It can be hard for enterprise security teams to identify and manage shadow cloud applications used by employees and lines of business across an organization. Will a development team, business team or other non-IT organization plan for — and be ready to remediate — ransomware in the cloud to the same extent as the technology organization?

Even if shadow IT isn’t a factor for an organization, initial notification of a ransomware event might come through a different channel than expected. For example, notifications could come from a relationship manager for larger deployments; a defined escalation channel with the service provider, which might be a business team; or through a provider-maintained service portal.

Also, keep in mind that both the resolution and implementation of specific countermeasures might need to be done through different channels. As an example, if a key activity in response to a rapidly proliferating ransomware, like WannaCry, is to proactively patch, the manner in which you affect this might vary for the cloud — an enterprise might need to schedule a maintenance window with its provider, for instance.

Aside from IaaS, other cloud models can be impacted, as well. Even SaaS isn’t immune — consider storage such as Dropbox, Google Drive, etc. Typically, these services work by syncing local files to the cloud; for a small organization, this might constitute its primary storage, backup or data sharing mechanism. What happens when the local files are encrypted, deleted, overwritten with garbage or otherwise compromised by ransomware? Those changes will be synced to the cloud.

Mitigation strategies for cloud ransomware

What can organizations do to prepare for ransomware in a cloud environment? There are a few things that can make response significantly easier. Probably the most effective thing organizations can do — for both cloud environments and for any other environment — is to specifically exercise response and escalation procedures.

Regardless of what method an organization employs, though, the most important thing is to think through it in advance and view protection measures critically.

For example, a tabletop exercise can be very helpful in this regard. A tabletop exercise defuses the primary question: will you pay the ransom? Invariably, someone will suggest paying it regardless of law enforcement and others arguing against it — discussing this specifically ahead of time helps clarify pros and cons when adrenaline levels aren’t off the charts.

Secondly, working through alert and response scenarios ahead of time means you get answers to key questions: how will you be notified of an event? Who will be notified, and what notification pathways correspond to specific cloud relationships? Also, what is required to take responsive action in each of those channels?

It’s also a useful idea to undertake a systematic risk assessment specifically for ransomware. You might, for example, look at backup and response processes to ensure that, should data be specifically targeted by ransomware that seeks to render it inaccessible, the organization has thought through protection and recovery strategies at the technical level.

For an IaaS relationship, think through and test backup and response services that service providers might offer, technical controls that they offer and the countermeasures the organization already employs. This level of risk analysis is probably already done for the enterprise as a whole, but you should take measures to specifically extend that to cloud relationships. This can be somewhat time-consuming for organizations that have numerous service provider relationships in place, but this effort can be folded into a broader activity that has value beyond just ransomware — for example, malware mitigation more generally, data gathering about cloud relationships, threat modeling, cloud governance or other activities that involve the systematic analysis of cloud relationships.

The arguably harder situation in the event of ransomware in the cloud is the intersection of SaaS and smaller organizations — specifically, the possibility of corruption of cloud storage through synchronization of ransomware-impacted files to a remote storage repository. Specific measures to prevent this are available, such as keeping a manually synced or time-initiated mirror of data at another repository, assuming that the volume in question isn’t such that this is prohibitively expensive.

Alternatively, backup solutions that keep prior iterations of data can provide a means of recovery even if the primary storage location is compromised. Regardless of what method an organization employs, though, the most important thing is to think through it in advance and view protection measures critically.

 

Chime in and let us know what you are doing to stay proactive.

What does NYACP think of us?

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ITG remains committed to their clients day in and day out. Whenever you need someone, you know who to call. Mike and the ITG team care so much about the clients that they want to spread the word. Although it may be strange if Mike stood on a rooftop yelling about all the ways they can help someone, we figured the clients could tell you best. We recently interviewed Linda from NYACP, New York Chapter American College of Physicians, to get her take on ITG and to find out more about what she does!

NYACP is a not-for-profit professional service organization providing education, NYACPadvocacy and quality improvement/practice management for 12,000 internal medicine physicians in New York state. Linda loves that her work focuses on improving healthcare and helping members achieve success in the ever-changing practice environment.

 

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In a world of such uncertainty and change, wouldn’t you want to feel that passion? Every business will suffer from technological issues, updates and threats to operations by viruses and other intrusions. Lucky for Linda, her limited IT experience was in hiring the right consultant.  She has better peace of mind within the company since working with ITG. She has been able to learn more about technology as her business grew and came to better understand the impact of technology and interoperability. This allows her to feel more comfortable with her entire IT infrastructure allowing her to focus more on management and operations.

 

She was first introduced to ITG by word of mouth from colleagues. After interviewing others and assessing the best choice, Linda chose ITG because of their experience and local reach. She has not been disappointed, and its been years working together! When asked what the process is like to work with ITG she said: “They are a sound, reliable partner, they respond to our needs expeditiously and completely.” She considers the ability to ask questions and get “helpful, meaningful information in easy to understand language (and Diagrams!!!)” to be the best value for a busy executive.24009d004811274573e0ea87c61afa4c.png

Did you Know……….

  • Her favorite part of working with ITG is “the staff, the reliability of their recommendations and their service”!
  • There are laws and regulations in place that require companies to take measures to prevent data breaches and other attacks.

You too can have the peace of mind in your day to day life by partnering with a company that cares about your business, answers questions and immediately responds to concerns. Reach out to ITG today and speak with the team about how they can help!

 

Here’s what keeps your CISO up at night

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As seen on February 14th, 2018 on Helpnetsecurity.

89.1 percent of all information security leaders are concerned about the rise of digital threats they are experiencing across web, social and mobile channels, according to the 2018 CISO Survey by RiskIQ.

ciso worry

Some 1,691 U.S. and U.K. information security leaders across multiple verticals, including enterprise, consulting, government and education, provided insights into their cyber risk concerns and plans for 2018.

Overall, the survey revealed a coming “perfect storm,” where the problem of staff shortages collides with escalating cybercrime, leaving organizations ill-equipped to manage and respond to cyber risks and threats that are accelerating in an era of digital transformation, pervasive connections and increasingly sophisticated attack strategies sponsored by nation-states and rogue actors.

As the Spectre and Meltdown security flaws in Intel chips dominated the news in early 2018, and after a year of major security breach announcements and settlements, including Equifax, Yahoo and Anthem, the following findings are hardly surprising:

  • 67 percent of cybersecurity leaders do not have sufficient staff to handle the daily barrage of cyber alerts they receive
  • 60 percent expect digital threats to grow as their organizations increase online engagement with customers
  • The top three digital threats information security leaders fear are phishing and malware attacks on employees and customers; brand impersonation, abuse, and reputational damage; and information breaches
  • The top risk organizations face today is a lack of experienced staff to monitor and help protect networks from cybercrime
  • Currently, 37 percent of firms have engaged a managed security services provider (MSSP) to help monitor and manage cyberthreats.

ciso worry

“The RiskIQ 2018 CISO Survey illuminates a growing industry-wide problem, which is that cybercrime is growing at scale, and enterprises are already experiencing critical staff shortages. That’s one reason 1 in 3 organizations have engaged with an MSSP to combat cyber risks and threats, and we expect that number to grow as the competition for top security talent gets far more intense,” said Lou Manousos, CEO at RiskIQ.

 

Check out all of our services offered at our website or call us today: 518-479-3881.

The biggest cloud security threats, according to the CSA

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Article By: Rob Shapland of First Base Technologies LLP

The Cloud Security Alliance recently released its 2017 report on “The Treacherous 12,” a detailed list of the most significant cloud security threats. The list was compiled by surveying industry experts and combining the results with risk analysis to determine the threats that are most prevalent to organizations storing data in the cloud.

An interesting observation is how similar cloud security threats are to the risks of storing data anywhere else. The data in the cloud is still stored in a data center, and it can still be accessed by hackers via many of the same methods they have always used, such as email phishing, weak passwords and a lack of multifactor authentication.

There seems to be a general opinion among many organizations that storing your data in the cloud — specifically in infrastructure as a service — outsources the security completely, with an almost out of sight, out of mind attitude. However, as cloud service providers will point out, there is a shared responsibility model that means although the cloud provider may be in charge of the underlying infrastructure, your organization is responsible for the security of the applications and data that reside on that hardware.images (2)

The top cloud security threats

The key cloud security threats worth highlighting from “The Treacherous 12” report are the insider threat, the risk of data loss and insufficient due diligence. They demonstrate the casual attitude many organizations have about the use and management of cloud services.

There are many cases where organizations use cloud services as a way of bypassing what is seen as an overly restrictive IT department, whereas, in reality, the IT team is trying to protect the data. By bypassing the IT team and signing up for cloud services without their consent, the business can think it’s becoming more agile in its approach, but, in reality, it is circumventing restrictions that were designed to reduce the risk of a data breach.

The data in the cloud is still stored in a data center, and it can still be accessed by hackers.

There are many different SaaS providers offering tools and services to organizations with slick marketing and promises of positive ROI. However, the due diligence that is done on these services is lacking, which may be surprising.

For example, if your organization outsources its HR data to a small SaaS company, performing security due diligence on it should be a key prerequisite. That company may spend only a fraction of what your organization spends on security, and it may be a very attractive target for hackers because of the data it stores. Your organization’s data may be far more likely to be stolen through that third party.

You also may be reliant on that organization’s backups to prevent data loss; storing critical data on another company’s network leaves your organization at even greater risk. There is also the added risk of insider attacks; the employees of the SaaS company have not been through your vetting procedures, and its processes for monitoring staff may not be as robust as yours.

Overall, the Cloud Security Alliance’s report successfully highlights the key cloud security threats and just how similar those risks are to storing data anywhere else. It provides a timely reminder to ensure that enterprises treat the data they store in the cloud with the same care and attention that it would if it were storing it on premises.

 

Are you convinced yet? Our MSS services are a proactive and detective service to reduce security risks. Call us today to find out how we can help prevent the inevitable 518-479-3881.